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  • Grimaces of the weary village

    Rimaldas Viksraitis. Grimaces of the Weary Village

    £30.00

    RIMALDAS VIKSRAITIS. GRIMACES OF THE WEARY VILLAGE. 2012. Paperback/English, 120 pages, 50 illustrations. By Rimaldas Viksraitis, images selected by Martin Parr. Slightly insane and wonderfully surreal Rimaldas Viksraitis’s images of abandonment in deepest rural Lithuania mix reportage and voyeurism to surreal and disturbing effect. This book is a beautifully printed testament to Viksraitiss strange, frightening and darkly humorous world.


  • Seeing through the artists hand

    Rustam Khalfin. Seeing Through the Artist’s Hand

    £14.99

    Khalfin, a Tatar, born in Tashkent (Uzbekistan), began his professional life during the stagnant Soviet era, graduating in 1972 from the Moscow Architecture Institute. In the 1980s, while residing in St Petersburg, he became involved with the circle surrounding Vladimir Sterligov – a close associate of Kasimir Malevich. It was then that Khalfin was first exposed to the richness of the Russian Avant-garde, a point of departure for his own painting. Shortly thereafter, in partnership with his wife Lydia, he began to pioneer performance art in Kazakhstan. From then Khalfin had ceaselessly experimented with a variety of media, also including painting, sculpture, installation, and video.

     


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    SERGEI PARAJANOV. Portfolio

    £2,800.00

    Portfolio of 15 lambda prints scanned from the original collages and film frames of Sergei Parajanov. Produced by White Space Gallery and Parajanov’s Museum, Yerevan, 2012. Edition of 12 in presentation portfolio box with title page and authetification from the Parajanov Museum director Zaven Sargissian. Each photo mounted on card with a stamp, image size 20 x 30 and 30×30 cm. Mount size 50 x 40 cm. All images included in the Mirror and Pomegranate catalogue produced for an exhibition “Mirror and Pomegranate” in 2012


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    Sergey Bratkov. Teddy

    £833.33

    Sergey Bratkov was born in 1960 in the industrial city of Kharkov in Ukraine, where he studied at the Repin Art College and the Polytechnical Academy. Since 2000 he has lived and worked in Moscow. For more than twenty years, Sergey Bratkov has documented post-Soviet life in the streets of Kyiv, Kharkiv and Moscow, using irony and a very subjective approach to emphasise the aesthetic and moral taboos of contemporary Eastern European society. Bratkov’s native city – which after the fall of the Soviet Union has been inhabited by orphans, prostitutes and homeless people – is his source of inspiration. With his shots he freezes pressing social themes relating to a world lost as a result of a sudden and traumatic change. His portraits immortalise lonely and isolated people: (anti)heroes who live in a defeated universe, and whose only possibility of rebirth lies in the commercialization of their own bodies. In 2000 and 2001 Bratkov dedicated himself to important series of portraits such as Kids or Soldiers, Fighters Without Rules, Secretaries and Army Girls. Sergey Bratkov is one of the founders of the art group Fast Reaction Group, along with Boris Mikhailov and Sergey Solonsky.


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    Stas Makarov. Angels of St Petersburg

    £750.00

    Angels of St Petersburg 2014. Digital print on watercolour paper. 65 x 43 cm. Edition of 10. Stas Makarov was one of the original members of the ‘New Academy of Art’ in St Petersburg in the 1980s and 90s. This was a group of artists who rejected modernism and mined Russia’s imperial and totalitarian past, sometimes ironically, as well as Hollywood movies, western advertising, kitsch and homoerotica for classical ideals of beauty. Makarov’s ‘Angels of St Petersburg’ series of paintings, hand-coloured photographs and prints captures the faded grandeur of Russia’s imperial capital by focussing on details of architectural ornament and public sculpture. His prints are in the collection of the V&A Museum, London 


  • Stas makarov St Mark sepia

    Stas Makarov. Angels of St Petersburg

    £666.67

    Stas Makarov was one of the original members of the ‘New Academy of Art’ in St Petersburg in the 1980s and 90s. This was a group of artists who rejected modernism and mined Russia’s imperial and totalitarian past, sometimes ironically, as well as Hollywood movies, western advertising, kitsch and homoerotica for classical ideals of beauty. Makarov’s ‘Angels of St Petersburg’ series of paintings, hand-coloured photographs and prints captures the faded grandeur of Russia’s imperial capital by focussing on details of architectural ornament and public sculpture. HIs works are in the collection of the V&A Museum, London


  • Stas Makarov Angels back 2014

    Stas Makarov. Angels of St Petersburg

    £833.33

    Stas Makarov was one of the original members of the ‘New Academy of Art’ in St Petersburg in the 1980s and 90s. This was a group of artists who rejected modernism and mined Russia’s imperial and totalitarian past, sometimes ironically, as well as Hollywood movies, western advertising, kitsch and homoerotica for classical ideals of beauty. Makarov’s ‘Angels of St Petersburg’ series of paintings, hand-coloured photographs and prints captures the faded grandeur of Russia’s imperial capital by focussing on details of architectural ornament and public sculpture. The streaky print process used here is suggestive of peeling paint, washed-up beauty, or worn out ideals. His prints are in the collection of the V&A Museum, London


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    Stas Makarov. Angels of St Petersburg

    £916.67

    Angels of St Petersburg. 2000. Gummipigment print on paper 40 x 60 cm. Unique. Stas Makarov was one of the original members of the ‘New Academy of Art’ in St Petersburg in the 1980s and 90s. This was a group of artists who rejected modernism and mined Russia’s imperial and totalitarian past, sometimes ironically, as well as Hollywood movies, western advertising, kitsch and homoerotica for classical ideals of beauty. Makarov’s ‘Angels of St Petersburg’ series of paintings, hand-coloured photographs and prints captures the faded grandeur of Russia’s imperial capital by focussing on details of architectural ornament and public sculpture. The streaky gummiprint process used here is suggestive of peeling paint, washed-up beauty, or worn out ideals.Is prints are in the collection of the V&A Museum, London


  • TAgagarin

    Tatiana Antoshina. Yuri Gagarin, Belka and Strelka in Space

    £2,083.33

    Yuri Gagarin, Belka and Strelka dogs in Space. 2016. Sculpture: plaster, acrylic 40x60x10 cm. Edition of 5. Tatiana Antoshina, b.1956 is a Russian multimedia artist whose work has been exhibited at the Venice Biennale (56th Venice Biennale, State Pavilion of Mauritius, 2015), Moscow Biennale and the Asian Art Biennale. Antoshina’s work has also been the subject of numerous solo shows in Russia and beyond, including ‘Museum of a Woman’ held at White Space Gallery in 2004


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    Timur Novikov & Joseph Brodsky. Horizons

    £10.00

    Horizons features unpublished dialogue between leading figure of the St Petersburg underground art scene, Timur Novikov, and eminent Russian poet and  Nobel Prize winner, Joseph Brodsky. Their meeting in Amsterdam in 1993 (on the occasion of Novikov’s retrospective exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum) resulted in a fascinating and erudite exchange, reflecting a reciprocal network of cultural and autobiographical references to St Petersburg as a city “on the edge” – an intersection where Western and Eastern cultural traditions met. The book pairs poems by Joseph Brodsky with textiles and silkscreens by Timur Novikov. Edited by Dominik Czechowski, curator of the Horizons exhibition.

     


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