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  • IMG_8098

    Alexander Florensky

    £500.00

    The Russian Album. 2001. Set of five screenprints on paper 30×40 cm. Edition 21/40. Alexander Florensky (b. 1960) began his career in the 1980s as a traditional painter and illustrator but turned to conceptual art in the 1990s joining the satirical Mitki group. His Russian Album is an ironic take on the popular Russian taste for copies of nineteenth-century history paintings in the style of the ‘Wanderers’ school of social realists. For his purpose Florensky has adopted the idiom of the Lubok or folk print which depicted narrative, moral or satirical subjects and flourished in Russia into the early twentieth century. Alexander Florensky who works in duo with her artist wife Olga Florensky is a headliner of numerous exhibitions. They live and work in St. Petersburg and Tbilisi. ‘Florenskys’ works are kept in dozens of museums around the world. For over twenty years, they have been making impossible objects and other equally wonderful things. Their objects are incredibly organic coalescences of found objects of various kinds – sometimes ones that have lived at home for a long time, sometimes ones found on the trash heap, sometimes bought at an expensive antiques stores. ….their oeuvre exudes light irony and feeds on the observation of children’s games and wishes, which have made themselves at home in the adults’ heads and have no desire to leave…In their large projects, the Florenskys show objects, paintings, photographs, drawings, silk-screens, blueprints, films (a mix of animation, documentary, and feature films). Alexander Evangely



  • IMG_8043

    Alexander Florensky

    £416.67
    A.A. Alekhin (1892-1946), Chess World Champion. 2005. Silkscreen print on paper 62×86 cm. Edition of 100 + 30 AP. Alexander Florensky (b. 1960) began his career in the 1980s as a traditional painter and illustrator but turned to conceptual art in the 1990s joining the satirical Mitki group. His Russian Album is an ironic take on the popular Russian taste for copies of nineteenth-century history paintings in the style of the ‘Wanderers’ school of social realists. For his purpose Florensky has adopted the idiom of the Lubok or folk print which depicted narrative, moral or satirical subjects and flourished in Russia into the early twentieth century. Alexander Florensky who works in duo with her artist wife Olga Florensky is a headliner of numerous exhibitions. They live and work in St. Petersburg and Tbilisi. ‘Florenskys’ works are kept in dozens of museums around the world. For over twenty years, they have been making impossible objects and other equally wonderful things. Their objects are incredibly organic coalescences of found objects of various kinds – sometimes ones that have lived at home for a long time, sometimes ones found on the trash heap, sometimes bought at an expensive antiques stores. ….their oeuvre exudes light irony and feeds on the observation of children’s games and wishes, which have made themselves at home in the adults’ heads and have no desire to leave…In their large projects, the Florenskys show objects, paintings, photographs, drawings, silk-screens, blueprints, films (a mix of animation, documentary, and feature films). Alexander Evangely


  • IMG_8045

    Alexander Florensky

    £416.67

    Portrait of Peter the Great, 1743, from the gravure by P. Subeiran from the portrait by L. Karavak. 2005. Silkscreen print on paper 62×86 cm. Edition of 100 + 30 AP. Alexander Florensky (b. 1960) began his career in the 1980s as a traditional painter and illustrator but turned to conceptual art in the 1990s joining the satirical Mitki group. His Russian Album is an ironic take on the popular Russian taste for copies of nineteenth-century history paintings in the style of the ‘Wanderers’ school of social realists. For his purpose Florensky has adopted the idiom of the Lubok or folk print which depicted narrative, moral or satirical subjects and flourished in Russia into the early twentieth century. Alexander Florensky who works in duo with her artist wife Olga Florensky is a headliner of numerous exhibitions. They live and work in St. Petersburg and Tbilisi. ‘Florenskys’ works are kept in dozens of museums around the world. For over twenty years, they have been making impossible objects and other equally wonderful things. Their objects are incredibly organic coalescences of found objects of various kinds – sometimes ones that have lived at home for a long time, sometimes ones found on the trash heap, sometimes bought at an expensive antiques stores. ….their oeuvre exudes light irony and feeds on the observation of children’s games and wishes, which have made themselves at home in the adults’ heads and have no desire to leave…In their large projects, the Florenskys show objects, paintings, photographs, drawings, silk-screens, blueprints, films (a mix of animation, documentary, and feature films). Alexander Evangely



  • IMG_8047

    Alexander Florensky

    £416.67

    Artist Ilya Repin with his wife. 2005. Silkscreen print on paper 62×86 cm. Edition of 100 + 30 AP. Alexander Florensky (b. 1960) began his career in the 1980s as a traditional painter and illustrator but turned to conceptual art in the 1990s joining the satirical Mitki group. His Russian Album is an ironic take on the popular Russian taste for copies of nineteenth-century history paintings in the style of the ‘Wanderers’ school of social realists. For his purpose Florensky has adopted the idiom of the Lubok or folk print which depicted narrative, moral or satirical subjects and flourished in Russia into the early twentieth century. Alexander Florensky who works in duo with her artist wife Olga Florensky is a headliner of numerous exhibitions. They live and work in St. Petersburg and Tbilisi. ‘Florenskys’ works are kept in dozens of museums around the world. For over twenty years, they have been making impossible objects and other equally wonderful things. Their objects are incredibly organic coalescences of found objects of various kinds – sometimes ones that have lived at home for a long time, sometimes ones found on the trash heap, sometimes bought at an expensive antiques stores. ….their oeuvre exudes light irony and feeds on the observation of children’s games and wishes, which have made themselves at home in the adults’ heads and have no desire to leave…In their large projects, the Florenskys show objects, paintings, photographs, drawings, silk-screens, blueprints, films (a mix of animation, documentary, and feature films). Alexander Evangely



  • IMG_8042

    Alexander Florensky

    £416.67

    Emperor Nicholas II with HIs Wife Empress Alexandra Fedorovna. 2005. Silkscreen print on paper 62×86 cm. Edition of 100 + 30 AP. Alexander Florensky (b. 1960) began his career in the 1980s as a traditional painter and illustrator but turned to conceptual art in the 1990s joining the satirical Mitki group. His Russian Album is an ironic take on the popular Russian taste for copies of nineteenth-century history paintings in the style of the ‘Wanderers’ school of social realists. For his purpose Florensky has adopted the idiom of the Lubok or folk print which depicted narrative, moral or satirical subjects and flourished in Russia into the early twentieth century. Alexander Florensky who works in duo with her artist wife Olga Florensky is a headliner of numerous exhibitions. They live and work in St. Petersburg and Tbilisi. ‘Florenskys’ works are kept in dozens of museums around the world. For over twenty years, they have been making impossible objects and other equally wonderful things. Their objects are incredibly organic coalescences of found objects of various kinds – sometimes ones that have lived at home for a long time, sometimes ones found on the trash heap, sometimes bought at an expensive antiques stores. ….their oeuvre exudes light irony and feeds on the observation of children’s games and wishes, which have made themselves at home in the adults’ heads and have no desire to leave…In their large projects, the Florenskys show objects, paintings, photographs, drawings, silk-screens, blueprints, films (a mix of animation, documentary, and feature films). Alexander Evangely



  • IMG_8049

    Alexander Florensky

    £416.67
    Daniel Yuvachev (Kharms, 195-1942) 2005. Silkscreen print on paper 62×86 cm. Edition of 100 + 30 AP. Alexander Florensky (b. 1960) began his career in the 1980s as a traditional painter and illustrator but turned to conceptual art in the 1990s joining the satirical Mitki group. His Russian Album is an ironic take on the popular Russian taste for copies of nineteenth-century history paintings in the style of the ‘Wanderers’ school of social realists. For his purpose Florensky has adopted the idiom of the Lubok or folk print which depicted narrative, moral or satirical subjects and flourished in Russia into the early twentieth century. Alexander Florensky who works in duo with her artist wife Olga Florensky is a headliner of numerous exhibitions. They live and work in St. Petersburg and Tbilisi. ‘Florenskys’ works are kept in dozens of museums around the world. For over twenty years, they have been making impossible objects and other equally wonderful things. Their objects are incredibly organic coalescences of found objects of various kinds – sometimes ones that have lived at home for a long time, sometimes ones found on the trash heap, sometimes bought at an expensive antiques stores. ….their oeuvre exudes light irony and feeds on the observation of children’s games and wishes, which have made themselves at home in the adults’ heads and have no desire to leave…In their large projects, the Florenskys show objects, paintings, photographs, drawings, silk-screens, blueprints, films (a mix of animation, documentary, and feature films). Alexander Evangely


  • IMG_8064

    Alexander Kliot

    £666.67
    Two. 1995. Lithograph on paper 76×57 cm.Edition of 8
    Alexander Kliot was one of the members of the Sotvorchestvo Group, from St Petersburg, who aimed to push the boundaries of art into the spiritual realm. On completing his Master’s at the Academy of Arts in St Petersburg, in 1982, Kliot returned to the place of his birth to paint a series of portraits of the miners of Donetzk. We are not presented with a pictorial tableaux to glorify ‘the people’, we are instead given a series of single, helmeted heads, bringing us face to face with humanity. In 1992 the group held an exhibition in Aberdeen, sponsored by Mobile and the British Council, which eventually led to Kliot’s settling in London. As well as portraits Kliot also loved to paint landscapes, which he saw in terms of life and human activity, and his response to beauty or bleakness was always depicted as part of peoples lives. His spiritual understanding of the Russian landscape was also brought to bare on English scenes – his ‘Autumn, Hampstead Heath’ of 1995 a good example, not presenting us with a picture postcard view, but conveying the pervasive mood of an English Autumn. In 1998 Alexander Kliot’s life was tragically cut short when he died of cancer, contracted whilst painting the miners of Donetzk.


  • IMG_8061

    Alexander Kliot

    £666.67
    Composition. 1995. Lithograph on paper 57 x 76 cm. Edition of 8
    Alexander Kliot was one of the members of the Sotvorchestvo Group, from St Petersburg, who aimed to push the boundaries of art into the spiritual realm. On completing his Master’s at the Academy of Arts in St Petersburg, in 1982, Kliot returned to the place of his birth to paint a series of portraits of the miners of Donetzk. We are not presented with a pictorial tableaux to glorify ‘the people’, we are instead given a series of single, helmeted heads, bringing us face to face with humanity. In 1992 the group held an exhibition in Aberdeen, sponsored by Mobile and the British Council, which eventually led to Kliot’s settling in London. As well as portraits Kliot also loved to paint landscapes, which he saw in terms of life and human activity, and his response to beauty or bleakness was always depicted as part of peoples lives. His spiritual understanding of the Russian landscape was also brought to bare on English scenes – his ‘Autumn, Hampstead Heath’ of 1995 a good example, not presenting us with a picture postcard view, but conveying the pervasive mood of an English Autumn. In 1998 Alexander Kliot’s life was tragically cut short when he died of cancer, contracted whilst painting the miners of Donetzk.


  • kirsanov

    Andrei Kirsanov

    £333.33

    Airplane. 2013. Silkscreen. 40×30 cm. Edition 17/60. Andrei Kirsanov (1966-2018). Member the New Artists (Novye Khudozhniki) group, was making wild paintings influenced by German Expressionism, Pop Art and Primitivism. First operating out of a communal flat, New Artists held a series of influential exhibitions and parties, combining fine art with youth culture, music, cinema, fashion and performance. The springboard for the group’s foundation was the now proverbial creation of a “zero object”. Andrei was famous for producing a cover to iconic russian rock band Kino’s album “Blood Group”



  • BrightBrightDayRusCover

    Andrey Tarkovsky. Bright Bright Day. Russian Edition

    £80.00

    Andrey Tarkovsky. Bright Bright Day. Russian Edition. Polaroids by Andrey Tarkovsky. 1979-1984. Essay by Andrey Tarkovsky. Poems by Arseniy Tarkovsky. Translated by Kitty Hunter Blair. Introduction by Andrey A. Tarkvosky (Jr.) Polaroids edited by Stephen Gill. Interview with Boris Groys. Russian edition of the book was realised with kind support of Olga and Charles Thompson. English edition is out of print. English text can be found on www.brightbrightday.com



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